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Transom:
We read these poems together as commentaries on America – with the addressees being immigrants who must “lick the plate” before being embraced by the America of cars, man-parts, and metro areas. This should be a grave topic, but your poems approach it with humor and absurdity. What’s so funny about the New York Metropolitans?

Lichtenstein:
These poems come from a group of poems that play with difficult embraces – new places and old poses, a bilingual (and/or bicurious) brotherhood, a patch of ritualized grass in the middle of asphalt and concrete; the distance you travel from your starting point and the hand or fist that greets you when you get there.

What’s so funny about the New York Metropolitans, in particular? I suppose they’ve been the kicked-around younger siblings for most of their existence. Let’s not forget Marvelous Marv Throneberry, the favorite fruit flavor of Queens. 

Transom:
What’s the relationship between failure and swagger?

Lichtenstein:
If there’s virtue in swagger it’s that there is no relationship between it and success or failure. Swagger is a kind of raincoat for reality.