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Transom:
Where do you believe your poem may fit within the long history of translation that surrounds “Whoso List to Hunt”?

Watkins:
The speaking necklace has been carried from Petrarch by Wyatt and my poem studies the necklace but shifts direction, tone, form. I find the “Rima” swoony and hallucinatory, and “Whoso List...” charged with captive exhaustion. My poem I suppose internalises the energy of fascination.

Transom:
Imagine a teacher of Italian reading your poem and then going back to the original. What aspects of your translation would most annoy that teacher? In other words, where and why were you most deviant as a translator?

Watkins:
The gripping thing in both is the speech of the doe- the complexity of it. In Wyatt “wild though I seem tame” manages to reproach the deer, and Petrarch’s “it has pleased my Caesar” is the voice of a hostage forced into complicity.

My poem embeds these conflicts but without the power figure that stalks the original/s (Caesar/Henry VIII) or rather that agency has been transferred to the deer, which is a deviation.

Transom:
About halfway through your poem, the speaker states “I need to go to the forest, like a pair of snipe.” This line seems to imply that the speaker wishes to become two entities. Since this sense of a split speaking self is not really present in either Petrarch or Wyatt, why have you chosen to introduce this element to your translation?

Watkins:
In a sense both Petrarch and Wyatt are talking themselves out of the pursuit of a married deer – talking to the mirror. The speaker in my poem seeks something in the forest that can only be delivered by the self – to kill off the part that loves/defuse the part that fears.