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Transom:
We’re tempted to ask whether the phrase “Heir to,” the references to black clothing, and the skulls that appear in this poem are meant to take us into the universe of Hamlet. Does this poem function as a possible answer to the famous monologue?

LeMay-Lewis:
This question is so generous and insightful. The poem was not intended to address Hamlet, but its central concern regards confrontation, literal and psychological, and the consequences of a similar inability to act.

Transom:

Your poem is full of repetitions and self-corrective gestures. Is this paralysis (your “similar inability to act”) or propulsion?

LeMay-Lewis:
I’m sorry, I’ve gotten stuck in this question.

Thanks. “Propulsion” is an apt choice, as it suggests motion in fits, as a result of release rather than intention. Repetition is similar in that it builds force but goes nowhere. This maybe didn’t work out so well in Denmark. Still, in a more positive sense, in the white space future of the unresolved anything is possible.