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Chelko:
“December Songs” is a series of 100 word prose poems. They came out of a  vague frustration I have had for some time now with the lack of music in prose poems. They are wintry attempts at / explorations in prose music.

Transom:
What do you think characterizes prose music?

Chelko:
Well, let me begin by saying that, of course, not all prose poems lack music. “December Songs” came out of a frustration I had/have with the prose poems I have encountered recently—in journals, etc. Moreover, I do not claim to have read all the prose poems out there—nor do I dislike all the prose poems out there. It's just I can't help but ask myself, upon reading one of the linebreakless bastards, Why this form? Admittedly, prose poems have always been a bit mysterious to me. Perhaps because what I love most about poetry, on a technical level, is the tension between sentence and line—the suspense, sonic play, and torque it affords language. This tension, on a fundamental level, distinguishes poetry from prose, right? So, what happens when the line is removed, but the poem remains? The prose poem? I feel like that's what I've been encountering too often lately, but the prose poem can't be that simple. It can't be that boring! While writing “December Songs” I was interested in what technical maneuvers I could employ as, for lack of a better term, 'stand-ins' for the tension between sentence and line. The result is perhaps, simply, an overly fragmented, repetitious, and often inverted prose. But I like. Prose music. The way it sounds.